Raleigh, NC, Lawn Mowing and Maintenance

Homeowners in the Triangle know a thing or two about landscaping. Raleigh enjoys the nickname, “City of Oaks” thanks to the majestic trees that line the city streets and parks. Those oaks provide shade for many backyards here. Both front and back lawns are common gathering areas as homeowners enjoy all that the seasons have to offer.

Knowing how to care for your grass is paramount to creating a lush, green lawn to enjoy year-round. Proper lawn mowing and maintenance in Raleigh is half the battle. Check out these tips on mowing and maintaining your lawn in the Triangle.

Know Your Grass Type

Most lawns in the city consist of fescue, which is a cool-season grass that grows well. Every grass type has a different recommended height, so it’s important to identify the type of grass growing in your yard. Mow fescue to a height between 3.5-4 inches tall for best results. Other grasses, such as Kentucky bluegrass, do best when kept between 2.5-3 inches. Check out the characteristics of your grass and compare it to other lawns in the neighborhood. 

Mow Only When Needed

While it’s convenient to mow the grass on a regular basis, there could be factors that play into the best time to mow. Rainy periods can cause the grass to grow quickly while periods of drought can stifle grass growth. You should mow once every 10-14 days on average. Pay attention to the yard and only mow it when it grows beyond the recommended height for your grass type.

Let Clippings Fly

Forget about bagging those clippings during a mow. Sure, it may look neater at first, but it could hurt your lawn. Allowing clippings to lie where they fall helps boost the nitrogen levels in the soil, which creates a healthier lawn. You may want to blow clippings off the sidewalk and pathways to keep neighbors happy.

Water Weekly

It’s common to see sprinkler systems giving area lawns a drink every day, but it’s actually bad for the yard. Grass responds better to longer weekly soakings than smaller daily drinks. One long soak during the week encourages grass roots to grow down into the soil, creating a strong, healthier lawn. Grass that has a stronger root system can stand up better to foot traffic, disease, and drought.

Feed It Well

Lawns need energy at different times of the year. Many Raleigh lawns can use a boost of energy at both the beginning and end of the growing season. If your yard is having trouble, consider adding another fertilizer treatment to help bring it back up to speed. Quick release fertilizers are great for a boost of energy and color. Slow release fertilizers will help give your grass a prolonged amount of energy through the summer.

Tackle Weeds

Weeds are a common enemy for anyone trying to grow a verdant lawn.  They compete with the grass for space and nutrients. A healthy lawn is your best defense against the invaders since the weeds will have little room to sprout. Many early season fertilizers also contain weed treatments. If you do find stubborn weeds, treat them with a pre-emergent or pull them out by the roots right away, before they have a chance to sprout new seeds.

Follow these tips to keep your Raleigh lawn looking great this year. Keeping these things in mind will help you create a beautiful yard that showcases your home.

Looking for more information about taking care of lawns and landscape in Raleigh? Go to our Raleigh, NC lawn care page.

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Written by Danielle Bradley

About Wikilawn

Wikilawn’s mission is to provide the best resources and information to help you enjoy your outdoor spaces the way you want. Whether you are a DIY, lawn-loving, gardening guru, or someone who wants help in picking a local lawn care professional, we can smooth your path to a beautiful backyard!

About Wikilawn

Wikilawn’s mission is to provide the best resources and information to help you enjoy your outdoor spaces the way you want. Whether you are a DIY, lawn-loving, gardening guru, or someone who wants help in picking a local lawn care professional, we can smooth your path to a beautiful backyard!

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